Partnerships

Community Involvement

Coastal Virginia Offshore Wind Electric Transmission

Help us build your clean energy future. Dominion Energy is committed to delivering what our customers want — energy that is safe, reliable and sustainable. We want you involved in making offshore wind in Virginia a reality.

The Coastal Virginia Offshore Wind (CVOW) project is positioning both Hampton Roads and Virginia as leaders in science, technology and innovation. Such an undertaking would not have been possible without important partnerships with environmental organizations, elected officials, governmental bodies, community leaders, community members and you.

As of May 2021, we are exploring six potential transmission routing options that will carry the energy from the offshore wind turbines to Virginia homes and businesses. Share your thoughts on our six routing options on GeoVoice today.

These routes represent information and data collected from public resources and direct engagement with the community. We also reviewed the available space for construction and operation, while carefully weighing potential impacts on residents and businesses, cultural and historic assets, and the environment.

These route options are not final, but rather are the next step in continuing the conversation with you and the community to gain feedback that will help develop a well-informed set of route options to present to state and federal regulators later this year. Visit GeoVoice and leave a comment on our routes today.

Public engagement is an integral part of project planning. This effort begins with listening and learning from the community and others and factoring in this input as much as possible.

 

CVOW Onshore Routing Options

In order to deliver the energy generated by the offshore wind turbines to homes and businesses, new electric transmission lines are needed to connect a switching station near Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia Beach to Dominion Energy’s existing Fentress substation in the City of Chesapeake. It is approximately 13 miles, but as you can imagine . . . we simply can’t go in a straight line.

Our routing map shows the current transmission routing options being explored. These routes represent information and data collected from public resources and direct engagement with the community. We also reviewed the available space for construction and operation, while carefully weighing potential impacts on the residents and businesses, cultural and historic assets, and the environment.

CVOW project map showing proposed switching station, cable landing station, and existing substation

We have identified routing opportunity in the 300-foot-wide corridor that was planned for the-now-former Southeastern Parkway and Greenbelt road project — this open and mostly undeveloped area limits crossing private properties and proximity to homes. It is not without impacts, but each routing option uses it to achieve good routing practices of using both open spaces and existing rights-of-way.

For this project, we will need a total of 140-foot-wide right-of-way to maintain electrical and safety clearances. However, when we overlap with existing transmission corridors, the amount of new right-of-way is minimized, and varies from only expanding the existing easements by 40 feet up to 105 feet. Please check back often for visual simulations, updated routing information and other important details.

Contacts & FAQs

If you need more information, reach out to us by phone at 1-844-319-2065 or by email at info@coastalvawind.com.

We are currently investigating a 100% underground route; however, due to the electrical and construction complexity, more study is necessary to determine feasibility. We are committed to reviewing it and sharing it with the public.


Cost estimates are still being developed and will be included in the overall CVOW project costs. We will have estimates in a few months for each routing option.


Depending on the route, we could collocate near three different structures — ranging from an average height of 77 feet up to 127 feet. Our new CVOW structures could be around an average of 110 feet tall.


No. Surveying and community input will inform which route is preferable and feasible to deliver the offshore wind energy to Virginia residences and businesses. As part of that process, we’re also working with the cities of Virginia Beach and Chesapeake and the Navy to identify possible routes.


Based on the energy output of the offshore windfarm, three transmission lines are needed for a reliable and resilient means for customers to fully realize the benefits of this zero-carbon generation source.